Coastal / Marine Management

Tasman’s marine area extends from Kahurangi Lighthouse in the south-west to Champion Road (Richmond) in the north-east. Including the seabed, the marine area extends seaward from the mean high water mark out to the 12 nautical mile territorial limit. This covers a coast line of approximately 725 kilometres and includes many estuaries and inlets.

Golden and Tasman Bays (the Nelson Bays)

The area can be divided into three distinct geographical regions, Golden Bay and Tasman Bay, collectively known as Nelson Bays, and the West Coast. 

Golden Bay's western boundary is Farewell Spit.  Farewell Spit stretches 30 kilometres eastward into the Tasman Sea from the Cape Farewell mainland. The spit is an active feature and is still getting longer.  A dune-fringed sandy beach faces the Tasman Sea while on the southern side the spit bounds an extensive shallow mudflat. Farewell Spit is on the Ramsar List of Wetlands of International Significance.

Golden Bay lies at the edge of the junction between the Tasman Sea and Cook Strait. It stretches for 45 kilometres from Farewell Spit in the north to Separation Point located within Abel Tasman National Park at its southern extremity. Beyond this point, the larger of the two bays at the top of the South Island, Tasman Bay begins. Tasman Bay extends form Separation point to French Pass and Durville Island in the East.

An assessment of the ecological and landscape importance of the coastal environment from Kahurangi Point to Waimea Inlet was undertaken by the Department of Conservation in the early 1990’s (Davidson et al, 1993). Three areas were recognised as having international importance: Farewell Spit and tidal flats (for the ecological values of the wetland), Abel Tasman National Park coastline and estuaries (for outstanding seascapes, Separation Point bryozoans, and one of only two known locations of Peppercress Lepidium banksii) and No-Mans Island in Waimea Estuary (for the other known location of Peppercress).  A total of 20 other sites were found to be nationally important, with 11 of these sites in Golden Bay, five sites in Tasman Bay and four sites on the West Coast.  A range of values were present at these sites including the presence of rare or threatened species, unlogged coastal catchments, spectacular seascapes, and high degree of naturalness. Recommendations are listed for the management of these sites.

Internationally and Nationally Important Coastal Areas from Kahurangi Point to Waimea Inlet

Golden and Tasman Bays (the Nelson Bays) fisheries are founded on the productivity of the Nelson Bays’ ecosystems. Phytoplankton (free floating, single-celled marine algae) start the marine food chain, by harnessing sunlight energy and nutrients to grow and reproduce. The Bays are a highly productive phytoplankton area feeding animal plankton (zooplankton) and filter-feeding shellfish that underpin aquaculture, fisheries and other ecological services within the Bays.


Aquaculture and Fisheries

Read about the productive areas for aquaculture, dredge fishing for shellfish and trawling or long line fishing.

Coast Care

Find out how the community and Council are working together to protect the natural coastal environment, through a programme called Coast Care.

Coastal Hazards

Learn about the erosion of the region's open coast and estuary shoreline.

Marine Oil Spills

Learn about marine oil spills and the Council's response capabilities.

Oceanography and Marine Water Quality

Read about oceanography, coastal water quality and the origin and processing of nutrients in the Nelson Bays, as well as the Golden Bay Marine Monitoring Buoy.


 

Oceanography and Marine Water Quality in the Nelson Bays

Information is available on oceanography, coastal water quality and the origin and processing of nutrients in the Nelson Bays, as well as the Golden Bay Marine Monitoring Buoy.

Oceanography and marine water quality in the Nelson Bays

Aquaculture and Fisheries within Nelson Bays

Both Bays offer a productive area for aquaculture, dredge fishing for shellfish and trawling or long line fishing for finfish.

Aquaculture and Fisheries within Nelson Bays

Coastline, Inlets and Estuaries with Nationally or Internationally Important Ecosystem Values

The bays have extensive inlets and intertidal areas.  These, along with stretches of coastline are of national and international importance for natural ecosystem values.  Descriptive and vulnerability assessments have been carried out for some inlets.

Tasman District Council Estuarine Information

TRMP Part III Marine areas with Nationally or Internationally Important Ecosystem Values

Coastal/Marine Resource Consent Information

Under Part III of the Tasman Resource Management Plan (TRMP), the Council has rules around the coastal marine area for sustainable management of the Coastal and Marine Environment. 

Coastal Occupations, Activites, Structures and Distubance may require Resource Consent under the Tasman Resource Management Plan rules.

TRMP Part III Coastal Marine Area

Resource Consent Information