Part 3 - Council Activities - Environment and Planning

The Environment and Planning section is broken down into two groups of related activities:

The 10 year budgets for the Environment and Planning activities are outlined in the following table along with the 2011/2012 budgets for comparison.

Environment and Planning

 2011/2012

 Budget $

 2012/2013

Budget $

 2013/2014

 Budget $

 2014/2015

 Budget $

 2015/2016

 Budget $

Environmental Management

 9,020,013

 8,882,607

 9,909,546

 9,413,976

 9,847,195

Public Health and Safety

 4,367,854

 4,560,035

 4,750,424

 4,856,787

 5,159,570

 TOTAL COSTS

 13,387,867

 13,442,642

 14,659,970

 14,270,763

 15,006,765

Environment and Planning

 2016/2017

Budget $

 2017/2018

 Budget $

 2018/2019

 Budget $

 20019/2020

 Budget $

 2020/2021

 Budget $

 2021/2022

 Budget $

Environmental Management

 10,250,420

 10,798,480

 11,146,440

 11,641,828

 12,047,450

 12,416,493

Public Health and Safety

 5,311,081

 5,538,840

 5,636,726

 5,874,504

 6,193,373

 6,429,995

 TOTAL COSTS

 15,561,501

 16,337,320

 16,783,166

 17,516,332

 18,240,823

 18,846,488

Details of each of these groups of activities are outlined in the following pages. These pages cover what the Council does in relation to each activity group, why we do it, the contribution of the activities to the Community Outcomes, the activity goal, any key issues, how we will measure our performance, the key things we plan to do and any major projects and funding arrangements.

i. Environmental Management 

What we do

Council’s environmental management functions  and responsibilities include:

  • •      The provision of policy advice, including responses to Government environmental requirements.
  • •      The development and implementation of resource management policies and plans.
  • •      Investigating significant environmental issues affecting or likely to affect the District.
  • •      Maintaining an efficient resource information base to provide advice on environmental conditions and issues affecting the District.
  • •      Assessing and processing resource consent applications and related compliance monitoring  and enforcement.
  • •      Undertaking biosecurity (plant and animal pest management) responsibilities including contributing to the Animal Health Board Bovine Tb vector control work in the District.
  • •      Promoting environmental education and advocacy programmes and running environmental events  to positively influence community behaviours.

Why we do it

Council undertakes its environmental management responsibilities in order to promote the sustainable management of Tasman District’s resources and to manage the consequences of human activity on the environment. Many of Council’s policies and plans are statutory documents required under legislation. Council’s state of the environment monitoring and information work is undertaken to monitor progress to achieve environmental outcomes, to help target planning controls, consent conditions and education programmes, to identify new issues, and to provide information of use to farmers, businesses and the public. Council processes resource consent applications and undertakes compliance activities to reduce the impact of human activity on other people and the environment. Environmental education and advocacy activities provide non-regulatory means of encouraging good environmental practices and outcomes. Council’s biosecurity activities help protect the environment from unwanted plant and animal pests.

Contribution to Community Outcomes

Community Outcomes

How Our Activity Contributes to the Community Outcome

Our unique natural environment is healthy and protected.

•    By having in place policies and plans that promote sustainable management of natural and physical resources and, where necessary, regulating activities which would over time degrade the environment or place resources under pressure.

•    By monitoring and investigating the state of the environment and the trends, risks, and pressures it faces, we can make better decisions and have in place policies, plans and consent conditions that promote sustainable management of natural and physical resources while enabling development. Where necessary, conditions can be imposed (and monitored) that regulate activities which overtime would degrade the environment or place resources under pressure.

•    By managing animal and plant pests, working with landowners and others to protect biodiversity, soil and water sustainability, and educating and encouraging responsible environmental behaviours.

Our urban and rural environments are pleasant, safe and sustainably managed.

•    By ensuring that living and productive environments are pleasant and safe, and that the activities of others do not adversely impact on citizens’ lives and are appropriate in location and scale.

•    By monitoring and investigating the state of the environment and the trends, risks, and pressures it faces, we can make better decisions and have in place policies and plans that contribute to this outcome.

•    By educating people and providing them with information to enable them to live more sustainably and to be more resilient.

Our infrastructure is safe, efficient and sustainably managed.

•    By having in place effective resource planning processes which ensure infrastructure provision is appropriate, efficient, and available to meet the demands of the community.

•    By promoting best practice and efficiency measures in the design and use of important utility services.

Our communities are healthy, resilient and enjoy their quality of life.

•    By having in place processes which safeguard the community’s health and wellbeing and which ensure resource use and human activities affecting resources do not adversely affect quality of life or community well-being.

•    By maintaining an effective flood warning system and working to identify contamination risks which are designed to promote safety of people and community well-being.

Our communities respect regional history, heritage and culture.

•    By identifying heritage values of significance to the District and having in place a framework for protecting and enhancing these values, including sites which are important to iwi.

•    By promoting an appreciation of culture and heritage through running an Environment Awards programme and targeted funding to heritage and related projects.

Our communities have access to a range of cultural, social, educational and recreational services.

•    By promoting involvement in activities like Sea Week, Enviroschools, and Ecofest, which allow different sections of the community to participate, learn and teach each other about matters relating to community well-being.

Our communities engage with Council’s decision-making processes.

•    By encouraging participation in the processes of developing and administering policies and plans.

•    By encouraging participation in the Enviroschools programme and events, like Ecofest, and making environmental information available and working with community groups
to help them make environmentally sound decisions.

Our developing and sustainable economy provides opportunities
for us all.

•    By encouraging people to adopt best practice in relation to their use of resources such
as land, water, air, and the coast.

•    By helping to provide resource information that enables development of opportunities for economic development and helps to identify potential hazards and constraints affecting such opportunities.

•    By processing resource consents that can facilitate economic development opportunities and compliance monitoring that can ensure fair and equal opportunities for all.

Our goal

The Environmental Management activity goal is to:

Effectively promote the sustainable management of the District’s natural and physical resources by:

  1. 1.    Identifying and responding to resource management policy issues and biosecurity risks in a manner that is effective, appropriate to the risks and opportunities, and is supported by the community generally.
  2. 2.    Achieving a robust and cost effective approach to environmental monitoring and resource investigations that will provide a good understanding of the District’s resources and the ability to assess environmental trends and manage risks to the environment.
  3. 3.    Providing a sound and appropriate policy planning framework that will protect and enhance our unique environment and promote healthy and safe communities.
  4. 4.    Managing the statutory processes involved in a way that is fair, lawful, timely and efficient, and which meets the expected environmental outcomes identified in policy statements and plans.
  5. 5.    Improving practices in the use, development, and protection of the District’s resources and minimising damage to the environment through inappropriate practices or the incidence of pests and other threats to the quality of the environment we enjoy.
  6. 6.    Educating communities and providing information to enable sustainable, resilient and productive communities within the District.

Key Issues

Council recognises that future demands for Environmental Management will be influenced by:

  • •      Population and economic growth and change – Population and economic growth places demands on the services provided in the Environmental Management group of activities. Over time Council may need to change how it responds to these issues. Council has developed a robust growth model to forecast residential and business demands and opportunities to supply the level of demand expected.
  • •      Changes in community expectations – Increasing environmental awareness could create extra demands on the Environmental Management activities. Some members of the community want Council to undertake more work in this area, however, others want less regulation and control.
  • •      Productive demands for resources and technological change – Productive demands for use of resources and technological change have the ability to impact on the scope of services and the manner of delivery of this activity. Council is not expecting any changes to have a significant effect on the activity in the medium term.
  • •      Environmental changes such as climate change risks – Changing patterns of weather, long term changes in the climate or the occurrence of climate-driven natural hazards will affect this group of activities. For example, Council’s policies relating to managing land use, hazards and the impacts of climate change will need to prepare for potentially increasing risks associated with pest incursions, sudden and severe weather events, drought risk and seawater inundation of low-lying coastal land.
  • •      Need for changes in planning documents – These can be driven by Government legislation or policy,  or by changes in Council policy.
  • •      Changes in the environmental risk profile – Council undertakes environmental monitoring activities  to increase its awareness of potential changes  in environmental risks.

The impact of these influencing factors on the demand for Environmental Management and the effect on  the current scale and mode of delivery is discussed in detail in the Environmental Management Activity Management Plan

Our level of service – What the Council will do and how we will measure performance over  the 10 years from 2012-2022

Levels of Service (We provide)

We will know we are meeting the Level of Service if...

Current Performance

We will develop and maintain an appropriate policy framework which effectively promotes the sustainable management of the District’s natural and physical resources by:

•    identifying and responding to resource management policy issues; and

•    providing a sound and appropriate policy planning framework that will protect and enhance our unique environment and promote healthy and safe communities.

The level of community support for Council’s resource management policy and planning work is rated as fairly satisfied or better through community surveys.

Actual = 58% The Communitrak™ residents’ survey undertaken in May/June 2011 showed 58% of residents were either satisfied or very satisfied with the activity.

 

See: Figure 1. Environmental Planning and Policy

 We will monitor environmental trends and conditions and have in place reporting systems which protect and inform the community about environmental conditions, changes and risks.

Council’s telemetry system (Hydrotel) is available to provide real time rainfall, river and sea level information for regional hazard management.

99.81%
fully operational

Council has the aim of meeting the Air Quality National Environmental Standard by 2020 (no more than 1 day > 50 µg/m3 PM10 per year) and will report on the website air quality breaches at the Richmond Central monitoring site of the limit of 50 µg/m3 PM10.

Number of exceedences currently is 11.

 

See: Figure 2. Number of Exceedences and
Second highest 24 hour PM10 for Richmond Central

 

Graph shows the total number of days per year that the NES levels were exceeded and second-highest exceedence (Note: no monitoring occurred in 2001/2002).

One issue based State of the Environment report to be released each year.

Two reports in 2010/2011

An annual Recreational Bathing Water summary report is drafted and reported to Council or a Committee by 31 July each year.


Report presented to and adopted at the June 2011 Environment and Planning Committee meeting.

We will provide a responsive and efficient process for assessing resource consent applications and ensuring compliance obligations are fairly and appropriately enforced.

The level of community support for Council’s resource management consent and compliance work is rated as fairly satisfied or better through community survey.

72%

Consent applications are processed within statutory timeframes (where they exist)

Notified consents 100%

Non-notified consents 99%

Limited notified consents 100%

An annual report is prepared and presented to Council or a Council committee each year which details:

–   The level of compliance with consent conditions or plan rules for those undertaking activities under resource consents or permitted activities as described under tailored monitoring programmes.

Annual compliance report presented to Council on 23 November 2011, showing that all resource consents monitored were assigned an appropriate compliance performance grade – refer figure 3. Consent and targeted permitted activity compliance performance grading.




–   Where significant non-compliance is recorded, that resolution is achieved within appropriate timeframes.

New measure.


An annual report is prepared and presented to Council committee or a Council meeting on Water Metering Compliance detailing the performance of consented and permitted activity ground and surface water abstractions requiring monitoring as defined in the Tasman Resource Management Plan.

Report presented to Council at the 25 August 2011 meeting.

 

An annual Dairy Monitoring report is prepared detailing the performance of the District’s dairy farms against the Council’s dairy effluent discharge rules and Clean Streams Accord targets.

Report presented to Council at the 14 July 2011 meeting, which detailed that 90% of the dairy farms were fully compliant – refer figure 4.

We will work with resource users, stakeholder groups and the public to promote environmentally responsible behaviour, to encourage soil conservation and riparian planting, to maintain and enhance biodiversity

The level of community support for Council’s environmental education projects and events is rated as fairly satisfied or better through community survey

Actual = 68%. The Communitrak™ residents’ survey undertaken in May/June 2011 showed 68% of residents were either satisfied or very satisfied with the activity – refer Figure 5. Satisfaction with Environmental Education.

We will implement the provisions of the Regional Pest Management Strategy in Tasman and in Nelson to ensure that pests included in the Strategy are managed to minimise their impact on our productive sector and our natural areas.

Timely reporting of pest management operations in accordance with requirements of the Biosecurity Act.

Annual report prepared each November.

We will know we are meeting the Level of Service if...

Forecast Performance

Year 1

Year 2

Year 3

By Year 10

The level of community support for Council’s resource management policy and planning work is rated as fairly satisfied or better through community surveys.

60%

70%

75%

75%

Council’s telemetry system (Hydrotel) is available to provide real time rainfall, river and sea level information for regional hazard management.

99%
fully operational

99%
fully operational

99%
fully operational

99%
fully operational


Council has the aim of meeting the Air Quality National Environmental Standard by 2020 (no more than 1 day > 50 µg/m3 PM10 per year) and will report on the website air quality breaches at the Richmond Central monitoring site of the limit of 50 µg/m3 PM10.

PM10 concentrations at Richmond Central monitoring site (BAM) continue to reduce (as corrected for meteorology)

PM10 concentrations at Richmond Central monitoring site (BAM) continue to reduce (as corrected for meteorology)

PM10 concentrations at Richmond Central monitoring site (BAM) continue to reduce (as corrected for meteorology)

Number of exceedences of the Air Quality National Environmental Standard:

Year 4 – 10 = No more than three exceedences by 2016 and no more than one by 2020.

One issue based State of the Environment report to be released each year.

One report released by
30 June

One report released by
30 June

One report released by
30 June

One report released by
30 June

An annual Recreational Bathing Water summary report is drafted and reported to Council or a Committee by 31 July each year.

Report prepared and reported to Council or a Committee by
31 July.

Report prepared and reported to Council or a Committee by
31 July.

Report prepared and reported to Council or a Committee by
31 July.

Report prepared and reported to Council or a Committee by
31 July.

The level of community support for Council’s resource management consent and compliance work is rated as fairly satisfied or better through community survey.

75%



75%

75%

75%

Consent applications are processed within statutory timeframes (where they exist)

100%

100%

100%

100%

100%

100%

100%

100%

100%

100%

100%

100%

An annual report is prepared and presented to Council or a Council committee each year which details:

–   The level of compliance with consent conditions or plan rules for those undertaking activities under resource consents or permitted activities as described under tailored monitoring programmes.

Annual report tabled to Council or a Council committee by 31 October, showing that all resource consents that are monitored are assigned appropriate compliance performance grades.

Annual report tabled to Council or a Council committee by 31 October, showing that all resource consents that are monitored are assigned appropriate compliance performance grades.

Annual report tabled to Council or a Council committee by 31 October, showing that all resource consents that are monitored are assigned appropriate compliance performance grades.

Annual report tabled to Council or a Council committee by 31 October, showing that all resource consents that are monitored are assigned appropriate compliance performance grades.

–   Where significant non-compliance is recorded, that resolution is achieved within appropriate timeframes.

80% are resolved within 9 months and 95% are resolved within twelve months

80% are resolved within 9 months and 95% are resolved within twelve months

80% are resolved within 9 months and 95% are resolved within twelve months

80% are resolved within 9 months and 95% are resolved within twelve months

An annual report is prepared and presented to Council committee or a Council meeting on Water Metering Compliance detailing the performance of consented and permitted activity ground and surface water abstractions requiring monitoring as defined in the Tasman Resource Management Plan.

 

Annual report tabled to Council or a Council committee by
31 October

Annual report tabled to Council or a Council committee by
31 October

Annual report tabled to Council or a Council committee by
31 October

Annual report tabled to Council or a Council committee by
31 October



 

An annual Dairy Monitoring report is prepared detailing the performance of the Districts’ dairy farms against the Council’s dairy effluent discharge rules and Clean Streams Accord targets.

95%
fully compliant



95%
fully compliant

100%
fully compliant

100%
fully compliant

The level of community support for Council’s environmental education projects and events is rated as fairly satisfied or better through community survey.

65%

65%

65%

65%

Timely reporting of pest management operations in accordance with requirements of the Biosecurity Act.


Annual reports tabled to Council or a Council committee by 30 November

Annual reports tabled to Council or a Council committee by 30 November

Annual reports tabled to Council or a Council committee by 30 November

Annual reports tabled to Council or a Council committee by 30 November

Figure 1. Satisfaction with Environmental Planning and Policy

Figure 1 - Satisfaction with Environmental Planning and Policy

Figure 2. Number of Exceedences and Second Highest 24 Hour PM10 for Richmond Central

Figure 2 - Number of Exceedences and Second Highest 24 Hour PM10 for Richmond Ce

Figure 3. Consent and Targeted Permitted Activity Compliance Performance Grading

 

Compliance rating

1.  Fully complying

639

2.  Non –compliance. Nil or minor adverse effect

385

3.  Non – compliance.  Moderate adverse effect

84

4.  Non – compliance.  Significant adverse effect

39

Figure 4. Dairy Monitoring

Figure 4 Dairy Monitoring

Figure 5 Satisfaction with Environmental Education

Figure 5 Satisfaction with Environmental Education

Major Activities

  • Implementing the Resource Policy work programme, including:
    • reviews of, and changes to, the Tasman Resource Management Plan
    • development plans for various settlements within the District
    • rural policy reviews (including subdivision and rural land use, landscape protection)
    • land disturbance review
    • network services rules and design guidance development
    • water allocation reviews
    • riparian land management strategy
    • natural hazards strategic policy review
    • review of the Tasman Regional Policy Statement and consideration of combining it with the TRMP
    • provision of policy advice.
  • Undertaking environmental monitoring of the District’s resources, state of the environment reporting, hydrology and flood warning monitoring, and provision of environmental information.
  • Providing advice to potential applicants for resource consents and processing resource consent applications.
  • Undertaking compliance activities to enforce planning rules, bylaws and resource consent conditions, and undertaking enforcement action when needed.
  • Undertaking plant and animal pest management planning and operations, including in Nelson City through a contractual arrangement with Nelson City Council, and funding the Animal Health Board to undertake its Tb Vector control programme in the District.
  • Undertaking environmental education and advocacy activities, including working with land owners to achieve sustainable land management objectives, school and business education programmes, and running educational events.

Key assumptions and uncertainties

The most significant assumptions and uncertainties that underlie the approach taken for this group of activities are:

a) A reasonable degree of reliability can be placed on the population and other growth projections that have been used as forecast assumptions to support the priorities in the Environmental Management activity. However, these remain projections, and need to be carefully tracked to ensure that they remain a reliable indicator of likely future trends.

b) Government regulation and other regulatory changes are capable of changing the scope, nature and processes associated with this activity. However, no allowance has been made for future changes  in legislation.

c) Future budgets are based on a similar level of effort being required to respond to the demands of this activity, but with growth and increasing contests over resource use, the outlook is for a slow level of increase in aggregate effort over the ten year period.

d) The importance of public education, its message, delivery and review should never be under estimated.

New capital expenditure

The main capital expenditure items associated with this group of activities is maintaining environmental and hydrology monitoring systems and ongoing renewal  of those systems. This expenditure is provided for  in the budget.

Significant negative effects

There are no significant negative effects from the group of activities other than the costs of providing the services. However, particular actions and decisions may result in adverse media coverage that may be regarded as being a negative effect. In such cases, Council will manage this risk by properly assessing options and the implications of its decisions and clearly justifying decisions. In balancing the needs and wants of many people, there may be some decisions which will impact negatively on some individuals or groups. Compliance and enforcement activities can generate both positive and negative responses within the community. Some landowners may perceive the cost of plant pest control as undesirable and the need to obtain resource consents as unnecessary.

Significant positive effects

There are many positive effects from this group  of activities, which help reduce the impacts of human activity on the environment and on other people and through encouraging behaviour change to reduce impacts on the environment.

Revenue and Finance Policy - Environmental Management section

Impact on the current/future social, economic, environmental and cultural wellbeing of the community

This group of activities has a significant positive impact on the social, economic, cultural and environmental wellbeing of the community, through:

  • Ensuring that the District’s development  is sustainable.
  • Resource information is available to developers and environmental agencies.
  • Environmental educational activities are undertaken to encourage behaviour with the community that promotes good environmental practices and supports community well-being.
  • Processing resource consent applications and undertaking associated compliance.

Beneficiaries of this group of activities

Council considers the beneficiaries of this activity to be the community, future generations, schools, resource users, sector groups (e.g., Farmers or businesses), resource consent applicants, and Tangata Whenua.

Distribution of benefits

The Environmental Management group of activities are considered to provide predominantly public benefits to the community as a whole. The community benefits from the sustainable management of the District’s natural and physical resources and enhanced community well-being. The Council’s monitoring and investigation activity provides information on the state of the environment, on the risks to environmental values, and on environmental trends. The information assists well-informed decision-making and planning which promotes a better environment and the sustainable use and development of resources. The community will benefit through being encouraged to change their behaviour to be more environmentally responsible. The community generally and the farming community will benefit from Council’s biosecurity operations (e.g. Bovine Tb control).

Successful resource consent applicants are able to use resources. The process safeguards the environment from adverse effects, and encourages a pleasant, safe and healthy lifestyle and environment for everyone. The major area of private benefit relates to resource consent application processing and any privately initiated plan changes.

Council acknowledges that the sole responsibility for funding of non-cash expenses associated with this group of activities does not lie with the beneficiaries, direct or indirect, of these activities, therefore, depreciation has been funded at the income statement level.

The costs and benefits of funding the group  of activities distinctly from other activities

Council has the appropriate systems in place to separately identify the charges and costs of this group of activities. Council considers that the most appropriate method to recover the public benefit component is general rate (rate in the dollar based on capital value) and considers the most appropriate method to recover the private portion is fees and charges. For transparency and accountability the costs associated with this activity have been separated from other Council activities. Some funding is secured under contract and grants from third party sources.

The extent to which the actions or inaction of particular individuals or a group contribute to the need to undertake the group of activities

Statutory obligations and community expectations are increasingly requiring good environmental policy, and good information to better understand our environment and the impacts we are having on it. Resource consent applicants generate the need for consents to be processed and monitored, and community groups may have concerns about the effects of an activity on them  or the environment.

Period in which the benefits are expected to occur

The benefits of this group of activities are both immediate in terms of direct public response to Council initiatives, through to long-term environmental benefits.

Funding

Operating

Capital

General Rates

Yes

Yes

Targeted Rates

Yes

Yes

Lump Sum Contributions

 

 

Fees and Charges

Yes

 

Interest and Dividends from Investments (Sundry Income)

Yes

 

Borrowing

 

 

Proceeds from Asset Sales

 

Yes

Development Contributions

 

 

Financial Contributions under the Resource Management Act 1991

 

 

Grants and Subsidies

Yes

 

Funding Impact Statement and Funding Sources for the Group of Activities

Environmental Management

 2011/2012

Budget $

 2012/2013

Budget $

 2013/2014

Budget $

 2014/2015

Budget $

 2015/2016

Budget $

 SOURCES OF OPERATING FUNDING

 

 

 

 

 

General rates, uniform annual general charge, rates penalties

 5,775,153

 6,110,050

 6,370,925

 6,654,421

 7,038,231

Targeted rates (other than a targeted rate for
water supply)

 306,485

 332,897

 335,877

 219,450

 101,851

Subsidies and grants for operating purposes

 30,000

 107,915

 52,633

 -  

 -  

Fees, charges and targeted rates for
water supply

 -  

 -  

 -  

 -  

 -  

Internal charges and overheads recovered

 -  

 -  

 -  

 -  

 -  

Local authorities fuel tax, fines, infringement fees, and other receipts

 3,169,665

 2,556,401

 2,643,248

 2,714,935

 2,809,700

 TOTAL OPERATING FUNDING

 9,281,303

 9,107,263

 9,402,683

 9,588,806

 9,949,782

 

 

 

 

 

 

APPLICATIONS OF OPERATING FUNDING

 

 

 

 

 

Payments to staff and suppliers

 5,621,752

 5,566,106

 6,512,929

 5,924,728

 6,292,892

Finance costs

 109,705

 94,680

 91,343

 75,239

 38,273

Internal charges and overheads applied

 3,288,556

 3,221,821

 3,305,274

 3,414,009

 3,516,030

Other operating funding applications

 -  

 -  

 -  

 -  

 -  

TOTAL APPLICATIONS OF OPERATING
FUNDING

 9,020,013

 8,882,607

 9,909,546

 9,413,976

 9,847,195

 

 

 

 

 

 

SURPLUS (DEFICIT) OF OPERATING FUNDING

 261,290

 224,656

 (506,863)

 174,830

 102,587

 

 

 

 

 

 

SOURCES OF CAPITAL FUNDING

 

 

 

 

 

Subsidies and grants for capital expenditure

 -  

 -  

 -  

 -  

 -  

Development and financial contributions

 -  

 -  

 -  

 -  

 -   

Increase (decrease) in debt

 (119,221)

 (37,992)

 (123,108)

 (483,201)

 (745,593)

Gross proceeds from sale of assets

 -  

 -  

 750,000

 500,000

 750,000

Lump sum contributions

 -  

 -  

 -  

 -  

 -  

TOTAL SOURCES OF CAPITAL FUNDING

 (119,221)

 (37,992)

 626,892

 16,799

 4,407

 

 

 

 

 

 

APPLICATIONS OF CAPITAL FUNDING

 

 

 

 

 

Capital expenditure

 

 

 

 

 

 - to meet additional demand

 -  

 10,380

 53,821

 55,597

 -  

 - to improve the level of service

 82,281

 98,091

 12,917

 46,701

 -  

 - to replace existing assets

 39,495

 48,267

 58,664

 88,956

 109,225

Increase (decrease) in reserves

 20,293

 29,926

 (5,373)

 375

 (2,231)

Increase (decrease) in investments

 -  

 -  

 -  

 -  

 -  

TOTAL APPLICATIONS OF CAPITAL FUNDING

 142,069

 186,664

 120,029

 191,629

 106,994

 

 

 

 

 

 

SURPLUS (DEFICIT) OF CAPITAL FUNDING

 (261,290)

 (224,656)

 506,863

 (174,830)

 (102,587)

 

 

 

 

 

 

FUNDING BALANCE

 -

 -

 -

 -

 -

Environmental Management

 2016/2017

Budget $

 2017/2018

Budget $

 2018/2019

Budget $

 2019/2020

Budget $

 2020/2021

Budget $

 2021/2022

Budget $

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SOURCES OF OPERATING FUNDING

 

 

 

 

 

 

General rates, uniform annual general charge, rates penalties

 7,373,993

 7,854,665

 8,069,634

 8,459,431

 8,778,923

 9,040,347

Targeted rates (other than a targeted rate for water supply)

 101,851

 101,851

 101,851

 101,851

 91,526

 78,030

Subsidies and grants for operating purposes

 -  

 6,099

 -  

 -   

 -  

 -  

Fees, charges and targeted rates for
water supply

 -  

 -  

 -  

 -  

 -  

 -  

Internal charges and overheads recovered

 -  

 -  

 -  

 -  

 -  

 -  

Local authorities fuel tax, fines, infringement fees, and other receipts

 2,891,580

 2,987,852

 3,069,913

 3,178,269

 3,277,739

 3,400,165

TOTAL OPERATING FUNDING

 10,367,424

 10,950,467

 11,241,398

 11,739,551

 12,148,188

 12,518,542

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

APPLICATIONS OF OPERATING FUNDING

 

 

 

 

 

 

Payments to staff and suppliers

 6,527,749

 6,852,427

 7,119,869

 7,426,039

 7,634,414

 7,899,032

Finance costs

 19,215

 27,319

 30,127

 26,729

 25,244

 23,075

Internal charges and overheads applied

 3,703,456

 3,918,734

 3,996,444

 4,189,060

 4,387,792

 4,494,386

Other operating funding applications

 -  

 -  

 -  

 -  

 -  

 -  

TOTAL APPLICATIONS OF OPERATING FUNDING

 10,250,420

 10,798,480

 11,146,440

 11,641,828

 12,047,450

 12,416,493

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SURPLUS (DEFICIT) OF OPERATING FUNDING

 117,004

 151,987

 94,958

 97,723

 100,738

 102,049

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SOURCES OF CAPITAL FUNDING

 

 

 

 

 

 

Subsidies and grants for capital expenditure

 -  

 -  

 -  

 -  

 -  

 -  

Development and financial contributions

 -  

 -  

 -  

 -  

 -  

 -  

Increase (decrease) in debt

 151,002

 64,382

 (30,665)

 (30,665)

 (30,665)

 (28,750)

Gross proceeds from sale of assets

 -  

 -  

 -  

 -  

 -  

 -  

Lump sum contributions

 -  

 -  

 -  

 -  

 -  

 -  

TOTAL SOURCES OF CAPITAL FUNDING

 151,002

 64,382

 (30,665)

 (30,665)

 (30,665)

 (28,750)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

APPLICATIONS OF CAPITAL FUNDING

 

 

 

 

 

 

Capital expenditure

 

 

 

 

 

 

 - to meet additional demand

 -  

 -  

 -  

 -  

 -  

 -  

 - to improve the level of service

 172,714

 154,549

 -  

 -  

 -  

 -  

 - to replace existing assets

 95,292

 61,820

 64,293

 67,058

 70,073

 73,299

Increase (decrease) in reserves

 -  

 -  

 -  

 -  

 -  

 -  

Increase (decrease) in investments

 -  

 -  

 -  

 -  

 -  

 -  

TOTAL APPLICATIONS OF CAPITAL FUNDING

 268,006

 216,369

 64,293

 67,058

 70,073

 73,299

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SURPLUS (DEFICIT) OF CAPITAL FUNDING

 (117,004)

 (151,987)

 (94,958)

 (97,723)

 (100,738)

 (102,049)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

FUNDING BALANCE

 -

 -

 -

 -

 -

 -

ii. Public Health and Safety 

What we do

This activity involves the provision of advice and discharging statutory functions in the areas of public health, building, environmental health (including liquor licensing, food safety), hazardous substances, animal control, civil defence and emergency management, rural fire, parking control and maritime safety. It involves assessing and processing permit and registration applications, the administration of bylaws, and associated monitoring and enforcement action.

Why we do it

The activity contributes to the sustainable development  of the Tasman District and the well-being of the community by ensuring that actions, or non-actions, taken by people  in Tasman District are lawful, sustainable and safe.

Much of the work done within the activity is to protect public health and safety, and in response to central government legislation.

While Council does not have a choice about providing the services, there is some discretion over the manner and degree to which the functions are delivered. In the past, the rationale for Council’s involvement has been influenced by whether:

  1. The community has confidence in the service provided historically by the Council (and so the Council continues to provide the service).
  2. The Council already provides the service and to change the mode of delivery would be more costly and less effective.
  3. The community expects the Council to provide  the service.
  4. The Council considers that it can contribute to  and/or enhance community well-being by providing the service.

Contribution to Community Outcomes

Community Outcomes

How Our Activity Contributes to the Community Outcome

Our unique natural environment is healthy and protected.

Managing risk from rural fire and ensuring recreational boating is safe keeps Tasman special.

Our urban and rural environments are pleasant, safe and sustainably managed.

The activity ensures that living environments are safe, and that the activities of others do not negatively impact on citizen’s lives. Through ensuring buildings are well constructed, safe and weather tight, the activity contributes to the development of the District, and also ensures that the resale value of the community’s assets are protected.

Our infrastructure is safe, efficient and sustainably managed.

Parking control ensures parking facilities are available to ensure public access to urban retailers and services.

Our communities are healthy, resilient and enjoy their quality of life.

This activity safeguards the community’s health and well-being by ensuring standards of construction, food safety, and registered premises operation are met and that liquor consumption and nuisances from dogs and stock, and risk from fire do not adversely affect quality of life.

Our civil defence and emergency management system is designed to promote the safety of people and a resilient community.

Our communities have access to a range of cultural, social, educational and recreational services.

Safe boating and providing such things as ski lanes ensures community access to the coastal waters of Tasman.

Our communities engage with Council’s decision-making processes.

We encourage people to make preparations for civil emergencies.

Our goal

The Public Health and Safety activity goal is to:

  1. See that development of the District achieves high standards of safety, design, and operation with minimum impact and public nuisance.
  2. Offer excellent customer service in providing information on development and other opportunities.
  3. Ensure permit and licensing systems are administered fairly and efficiently and in a way that will protect and enhance our unique environment and promote healthy and safe communities.

Key Issues

Council recognises that future demands for the  Public Health and Safety group of activities will be influenced by:

  • Population and economic growth, and demographic change – Population growth places demands on the services provided in the Public Health and Safety group of activities. Over time Council may require extra resources to cope with additional activity and demand for services. Council has developed a robust growth model to forecast residential and business demands and opportunities to supply the level of demand expected.
  • Changes in community expectations – Some members of the community want Council to undertake more work in this area, however, others want less regulation and control. Changing expectations may lead to a need to increase or decrease levels of service.
  • Industrial practices and technological change – Both industrial practices and technological change have the ability to impact on the scope of services and the manner of delivery of this activity. Council is not expecting any changes to have a significant effect  on the activity in the medium term.
  • Environmental changes such as climate change.
  • Changes in legislation and policies – These can  be driven by Government legislation or policy,  or by changes in Council policy.
  • Changes in the environmental risk profile – Changing weather patterns or occurrence of natural hazards will affect the work of Council, particularly in the civil defence and rural fire activities.
  • Disruption caused by potential restructuring – Current legislation changes going through Parliament may affect the roles Council has relating to the Public Health and Safety activities and the way Council delivers the activities. Council will respond appropriately to those changes.

The impact of these influencing factors on the demand for public health and safety services and the effect on the current scale and mode of delivery is discussed in detail in the Public Health and Safety Activity Management Plan.

Our level of service – What the Council will do and how we will measure performance over  the 10 years from 2012-2022

Levels of Service (We provide)

We will know we are meeting the Level of Service if...

Current Performance

We will provide building control services in a professional and timely manner to ensure building work is safe and in accordance with the New Zealand Building Code.

Applications for building consent and code compliance certificates (CCC) are processed within statutory timeframes.

 

 

 

We maintain Building Consent Authority Accreditation.

94.3% of building consent applications were processed within statutory time frames.

 

86% CCCs were processed within statutory timeframes.

 

Reaccreditation as a Building Consent Authority was achieved March 2012.

We will provide an environmental health service that:

 

a. In association with other agencies, fosters the responsible sale and consumption of liquor.

 

 

b. Ensures that food provided for sale is safe, free from contamination and prepared in suitable premises.

 

 

 

In conjunction with the New Zealand Police, we detect no sale of liquor to minors through random controlled purchase operations run annually.

 

All food premises are inspected at least once annually for compliance and appropriately licensed.

 

 

 

Four operations were undertaken. Only one offence was detected during one of the operations.

 

 

100%

We will provide animal control services to minimise the danger, distress, and nuisance caused by dogs and wandering stock and to ensure all known dogs are recorded and registered.

All known dogs are registered annually by
30 September.

 

We respond to high priority dog complaints within 60 minutes, 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

96.2%

 

 

100%

We will have in place a civil defence and emergency management system that is designed to promote the safety of people and a resilient community in the event that emergencies occur.

The level of community support for Council’s civil defence emergency management activity is rated as fairly satisfied or better through community survey.

Actual = 53%. The Communitrak™ residents’ survey undertaken in May/June 2011 showed 53% of residents were either satisfied or very satisfied with the activity. – refer figure 1.

To safeguard life and property by the prevention, detection, restriction and control of fire in forest and rural areas.

The area of forest lost through fire annually does not exceed 20 hectares.

12 hectares of damage to production forest from rural fires.

We will provide Maritime Administration services to ensure Tasman’s harbour waters are safe and accessible and that all known commercial vehicle operators are licensed.

Residents with an understanding of Maritime Administration rate their satisfaction with this activity as “fairly satisfied” or better in annual surveys.

 

 

 

 

All known commercial vessel operators
are licensed.

Actual = 92%. The Communitrak™ residents’ survey undertaken in May/June 2011 showed 92% of residents with an understanding of the activity were either satisfied or very satisfied with the activity. Overall, 47% of residents were satisfied with the activity, with the majority of residents not being able to comment. – refer figure 2.

 

100%

We will provide parking control services to facilitate the public’s access to urban retailers and services, respond to any misuse of disabled parking, and remove reported abandoned vehicles.

Compliance by not less than 80 out of every 100 vehicles parking in time controlled areas within the Traffic Bylaw, based on an annual snap survey.

Survey undertaken in January 2011 with 83% compliance – target achieved

We will know we are meeting the Level of Service if...

Forecast Performance

Year 1

Year 2

Year 3

By Year 10

Applications for building consent and code compliance certificates (CCC) are processed within statutory timeframes.

 

 

 

We maintain Building Consent Authority Accreditation.

Building consents = 98%

 

CCCs =95%

 

 

Accreditation maintained

Building consents = 100%

 

CCCs =98%

 

 

Accreditation maintained

Building consents = 100%

 

CCCs =100%

 

 

Accreditation maintained

100%

 

 

CCCs =100%

 

 

Accreditation maintained

 

In conjunction with the New Zealand Police, we detect no sale of liquor to minors through random controlled purchase operations run annually.

 

All food premises are inspected at least once annually for compliance and appropriately licensed.

 

At least two annual operations with no offences detected.



100%

 

At least two annual operations with no offences detected.



100%

 

At least two annual operations with no offences detected.



100%

 

At least two annual operations with no offences detected.



100%

All known dogs are registered annually by
30 September.

 

We respond to high priority dog complaints within 60 minutes, 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

100%

 

 

100%

100%

 

 

100%

100%

 

 

100%

100%

 

 

100%

The level of community support for Council’s civil defence emergency management activity is rated as fairly satisfied or better through community survey.

50%

50%

50%

50%

The area of forest lost through fire annually does not exceed 20 hectares.

No more than 20 ha lost through fire annually.

No more than 20 ha lost through fire annually.

No more than 20 ha lost through fire annually.

No more than 20 ha lost through fire annually.

Residents with an understanding of Maritime Administration rate their satisfaction with this activity as “fairly satisfied” or better in annual surveys.

 

All known commercial vessel operators
are licensed.

90%

 

 

 

 

100%

90%

 

 

 

 

100%

90%

 

 

 

 

100%

90%

 

 

 

 

100%

Compliance by not less than 80 out of every 100 vehicles parking in time controlled areas within the Traffic Bylaw, based on an annual snap survey.

80%

85%

90%

95% - 100%

Figure 1. Satisfaction with Civil Defence Emergency Management

Figure 5 Satisfaction Civil Defence Emergency Management

Figure 2. Satisfaction with Harbour Managenment and Safety Activity

Figure 5 Satisfaction Harbour Management and Safety Activity

Major activities

  • Respond to enquiries, process permits and consents, and undertake inspectorial responsibilities under the Health Act, Building Act, Sale of Liquor Act, Food Act, Dog Control Act, Forests and Rural Fires Act, Transport Act, Maritime Transport Act, the Hazardous Substances and New Organisms Act, and associated regulations and Council bylaws.
  • Carry out Harbour Board functions including implementation of the Joint Oil Spill Contingency Plan (with Nelson City Council).
  • Carry out animal control responsibilities.
  • Carry out civil defence and emergency management responsibilities.
  • Carry out parking control responsibilities under Council’s Parking Bylaw.
  • Ensure fire risk in the District is effectively managed through supporting rural fire parties and the Waimea Rural Fire Committee.

Key assumptions and uncertainties

The most significant assumptions and uncertainties that underlie the approach taken for this group of activities are:

a) A reasonable degree of reliability can be placed on the population and other growth projections that have been used as forecast assumptions for the priorities in the Public Health and Safety activity. However, these remain projections, and need to be carefully tracked to ensure that they remain a reliable indicator of likely future trends.

b) It is possible that the income from fees and charges may differ from projections. Any variation from the forecast may indicate that development is occurring faster or slower than expected and this may force a re-think of the timing of any changes in the delivery of services.

c) Regulatory activities, because of the associated compliance costs, are always likely to be a target for Government review. Except for changes in food safety regulations, no allowance has been made for changes in legislation.

d) There will be a growing challenge to maintain the volunteer and community involvement in Council civil defence activities as volunteerism is in decline.

New capital expenditure

The only assets owned by this activity are a building, used as a dog pound, which was upgraded in 2010 and is managed through Council’s property portfolio, the harbour master’s vessel which is due for replacement in 2015/2016, and equipment, appliances and depots associated with rural fire management. The main capital expenditure in this group of activities is on replacement fire appliances to the approximate value of $34,000 plus inflation annually and replacing the harbour master’s vessel and equipment in 2015/2016 to the approximate value of $460,000. Council will be seeking subsidies from the National Rural Fire Authority towards the purchase of the fire equipment and appliances.

Significant negative effects

There are no significant negative effects from the group of activities other than the costs of providing the public benefit component of the services. However, particular actions and decisions may result in adverse media coverage that may be regarded as being a negative effect. In such cases, Council will manage this risk by properly assessing options and the implications of its decisions and clearly justifying decisions. Compliance and enforcement activities can generate both positive and negative responses within the community.

Significant positive effects

There are many positive effects from this group of activities, which help enhance public safety and reduce the impacts of human activity on other people.

Revenue and Finance Policy – Public Health and Safety section

Impact on the current/future social, economic, environmental and cultural wellbeing of the community

This group of activities has a significant positive impact on the social, economic, cultural and environmental wellbeing of the community, through ensuring that the District’s public health and safety is maintained and applications for permits and building consents are processed.

Beneficiaries of this group of activities

Council considers the beneficiaries of this activity to be property owners/operators, future owners/operators, the community, and central government. The setting and enforcing of safe standards, provides public health and safety for the wider community.

Distribution of benefits

Building control activity provides the majority of benefits to those applying for building consents, although there is some public benefit through the activity to maintain public safety, which is recovered through the general rate and uniform annual general charge.

Rural fire, harbourmaster and civil defence activities benefit public health and safety for the whole community. Where possible the cost of extinguishing a fire is recovered from the person responsible for lighting the fire where that can be determined. The Council considers that the community at large benefits from these activities.

The main benefits of environmental health services are public health and safety, through control of infectious diseases and monitoring of environmental standards.

The benefits from undertaking parking control, while ensuring fair access to CBD shopping, is largely considered to be a public benefit. Any infractions detected are, however, a private cost.

The benefits of dog control are considered to be largely public, through protection of the public. Private individuals benefit through administration of the registration system and returning lost or strayed animals. While there are public benefits, the Council considers that exacabators should fund this activity and therefore the public benefit is to be funded by registration fees.

Council acknowledges that the sole responsibility for funding of non-cash expenses associated with this group of activities does not lie with the beneficiaries, direct or indirect, of these activities, therefore, depreciation has been funded at the income statement level.

The costs and benefits of funding the group of activities distinctly from other activities

Council has the appropriate systems in place to separately identify the charges and costs of this activity. With the exception of dog control and parking control Council considers that the most appropriate method to recover the public benefit component is general rate (rate in the dollar based on capital value) and considers the most appropriate method to recover the private portion is fees and charges. For transparency and accountability reasons the costs associated with this group of activities have been separated.

The extent to which the actions or inaction of particular individuals or a group contribute to the need to undertake the group of activities

The need to undertake these activities is driven by statutory obligations and applicants who generate the need for consents and licences to be processed, and community groups who may have concerns about the effects of an activity on them or the environment.

Period in which the benefits are expected to occur

The benefits of this group of activities range from immediate private benefit gained through the granting of consents and licences, or responding to complaints (e.g. about dogs), through to longer term benefits  (e.g. from the construction of safe buildings).

Funding

Operating

Capital

General Rates

Yes

Yes

Targeted Rates

 

 

Lump Sum Contributions

 

 

Fees and Charges

Yes

Yes

Interest and Dividends from Investments (Sundry Income)

Yes

 

Borrowing

 

Yes

Proceeds from Asset Sales

 

Yes

Development Contributions

 

 

Financial Contributions under the Resource Management Act 1991

 

 

Grants and Subsidies

Yes

Yes

Funding Impact Statement and Funding Sources for the Group of Activities

Public Health and Safety

 2011/2012

Budget $

 2012/2013

Budget $

 2013/2014

Budget $

 2014/2015

Budget $

 2015/2016

Budget $

 

 

 

 

 

 

SOURCES OF OPERATING FUNDING

 

 

 

 

 

General rates, uniform annual general charge, rates penalties

 1,416,703

 1,574,825

 1,665,245

 1,691,562

 1,873,119

Targeted rates (other than a targeted rate for
water supply)

 -  

 -  

 -  

 -  

 -  

Subsidies and grants for operating purposes

 -  

 -  

 -  

 -  

 -  

Fees, charges and targeted rates for water
supply

 -  

 -  

 -   

 -  

 -  

Internal charges and overheads recovered

 -  

 -  

 -  

 -  

 -  

Local authorities fuel tax, fines, infringement fees, and other receipts

 2,991,299

 3,051,713

 3,165,791

 3,266,115

 3,372,647

TOTAL OPERATING FUNDING

 4,408,002

 4,626,538

 4,831,036

 4,957,677

 5,245,766

 

 

 

 

 

 

APPLICATIONS OF OPERATING FUNDING

 

 

 

 

 

Payments to staff and suppliers

 2,660,472

 2,830,942

 2,976,707

 3,025,410

 3,248,676

Finance costs

 20,051

 16,392

 15,467

 14,738

 28,940

Internal charges and overheads applied

 1,687,331

 1,712,701

 1,758,250

 1,816,639

 1,881,954

Other operating funding applications

 -  

 -  

 -  

 -  

 -  

TOTAL APPLICATIONS OF OPERATING
FUNDING

 4,367,854

 4,560,035

 4,750,424

 4,856,787

 5,159,570

 

 

 

 

 

 

SURPLUS (DEFICIT) OF OPERATING FUNDING

 40,148

 66,503

 80,612

 100,890

 86,196

 

 

 

 

 

 

SOURCES OF CAPITAL FUNDING

 

 

 

 

 

Subsidies and grants for capital expenditure

 -  

 -  

 -  

 -  

 -  

Development and financial contributions

 -  

 -  

 -  

 -  

 -  

Increase (decrease) in debt

 (18,745)

 (19,645)

 (19,645)

 (19,645)

 428,753

Gross proceeds from sale of assets

 -  

 -  

 -  

 -  

 -  

Lump sum contributions

 -  

 -  

 -  

 -  

 -  

TOTAL SOURCES OF CAPITAL FUNDING

 (18,745)

 (19,645)

 (19,645)

 (19,645)

 428,753

 

 

 

 

 

 

APPLICATIONS OF CAPITAL FUNDING

 

 

 

 

 

Capital expenditure

 

 

 

 

 

 - to meet additional demand

 -  

 -  

 -  

 -  

 -  

 - to improve the level of service

 -  

 -  

 9,688

 -  

 -  

 - to replace existing assets

 35,398

 36,330

 37,674

 72,276

 500,137

Increase (decrease) in reserves

 (13,995)

 10,528

 13,605

 8,969

 14,812

Increase (decrease) in investments

 -  

 -  

 -  

 -  

 -  

TOTAL APPLICATIONS OF CAPITAL FUNDING

 21,403

 46,858

 60,967

 81,245

 514,949

 

 

 

 

 

 

SURPLUS (DEFICIT) OF CAPITAL FUNDING

 (40,148)

 (66,503)

 (80,612)

 (100,890)

 (86,196)

 

 

 

 

 

 

FUNDING BALANCE

 -

 -

 -

 -

 

Public Health and Safety

 2016/2017

Budget $

 2017/2018

Budget $

 2018/2019

Budget $

 2019/2020

Budget $

 2020/2021

Budget $

 2021/2022

Budget $

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SOURCES OF OPERATING FUNDING

 

 

 

 

 

 

General rates, uniform annual general charge, rates penalties

 1,929,549

 2,050,552

 2,039,171

 2,155,655

 2,382,587

 2,441,560

Targeted rates (other than a targeted rate for
water supply)

 -  

 -  

 -  

 -  

 -  

 -  

Subsidies and grants for operating purposes

 -  

 -  

 -  

 -  

 -  

 -  

Fees, charges and targeted rates for water
supply

 -  

 -  

 -  

 -  

 -  

 -  

Internal charges and overheads recovered

 -  

 -  

 -  

 -  

 -  

 -  

Local authorities fuel tax, fines, infringement fees, and other receipts

 3,486,821

 3,597,825

 3,712,466

 3,835,637

 3,973,307

 4,115,731

TOTAL OPERATING FUNDING

 5,416,370

 5,648,377

 5,751,637

 5,991,292

 6,355,894

 6,557,291

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

APPLICATIONS OF OPERATING FUNDING

 

 

 

 

 

 

Payments to staff and suppliers

 3,336,532

 3,474,296

 3,563,411

 3,711,602

 3,877,973

 4,066,355

Finance costs

 46,103

 47,559

 46,768

 41,507

 39,217

 35,757

Internal charges and overheads applied

 1,928,446

 2,016,985

 2,026,547

 2,121,395

 2,276,183

 2,327,883

Other operating funding applications

 -  

 -  

 -  

 -  

 -  

 -  

TOTAL APPLICATIONS OF OPERATING
FUNDING

 5,311,081

 5,538,840

 5,636,726

 5,874,504

 6,193,373

 6,429,995

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SURPLUS (DEFICIT) OF OPERATING FUNDING

 105,289

 109,537

 114,911

 116,788

 162,521

 127,296

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SOURCES OF CAPITAL FUNDING

 

 

 

 

 

 

Subsidies and grants for capital expenditure

 -  

 -  

 -  

 -  

 -  

 -  

Development and financial contributions

 -  

 -  

 -  

 -  

 -  

 -  

Increase (decrease) in debt

 50,267

 (47,405)

 (47,405)

 (47,405)

 (47,405)

 (47,405)

Gross proceeds from sale of assets

 -  

 -  

 -  

 -  

 -  

 -  

Lump sum contributions

 -  

 -  

 -  

 -  

 -  

 -  

TOTAL SOURCES OF CAPITAL FUNDING

 50,267

 (47,405)

 (47,405)

 (47,405)

 (47,405)

 (47,405)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

APPLICATIONS OF CAPITAL FUNDING

 

 

 

 

 

 

Capital expenditure

 

 

 

 

 

 

 - to meet additional demand

 -  

 -  

 -  

 -  

 -  

 -  

 - to improve the level of service

 95,290

 -  

 -  

 -  

 -  

 -  

 - to replace existing assets

 41,690

 43,274

 45,005

 46,940

 91,097

 51,309

Increase (decrease) in reserves

 18,576

 18,858

 22,501

 22,443

 24,019

 28,582

Increase (decrease) in investments

 -  

 -  

 -  

 -  

 -  

 -  

TOTAL APPLICATIONS OF CAPITAL FUNDING

 155,556

 62,132

 67,506

 69,383

 115,116

 79,891

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SURPLUS (DEFICIT) OF CAPITAL FUNDING

 (105,289)

 (109,537)

 (114,911)

 (116,788)

 (162,521)

 (127,296)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

FUNDING BALANCE

 -

 -

 -

 -

 -

 -