Relocated Buildings or Constructed Using Second Hand Materials

Friday 8 January 2016

This page provides information on relocated buildings, and other buildings which are to be constructed using second-hand materials.

Relocated Buildings

A relocated building is one that is already built, and is being moved to a new location either as a whole structure or in several smaller parts (depending on the size of the building for transportation purposes). The original building may be currently located in the Tasman District, or elsewhere (in another District). This article has been drafted on the understanding that the building, in its new location, will be placed somewhere in the Tasman District.

Buildings Constructed Using second-hand Materials

A building may also be constructed using second-hand materials. This is usually the case where an existing building has been deconstructed, and packaged up ready for transportation to a new location, to then be pieced back together to form the basis of the original building.

General Information

Whether a building is to be relocated, or constructed using second-hand materials, the Council needs to understand the existing condition of the whole structure, or the individual elements.

The Council is also mindful of the fact that the original building, or second-hand materials, are more often than not being relocated from an area which invariably has different loading characteristics (e.g. wind, earthquake and snow loadings), plus an alternative exposure (corrosion) zone.

What does the Council Require for Relocated Buildings?

In no specific order, the Council requires the following when considering a building consent application for a relocated building:

A Building Conditions Report

This is to be provided by an individual, or company, who has the appropriate competence, qualifications and experience to provide such a report, and who has the necessary insurance cover to undertake the work.

The Building Conditions Report must include (as a minimum) all of the information listed below:

  1. Details of the design parameters of the building at its current (original) location (e.g. wind zone, snow loading, earthquake zone, and corrosion zone).
  2. Confirmation that the building is structurally sound.
  3. Confirmation the building is suitable for transportation.
  4. The age of the existing building. This may have a material effect on the intended of the building in its new location.
  5. Provide evidence of the currently lawfully established use (e.g. detached dwelling, outbuilding, or commercial office, as per NZ Building Code clause A1), construction and ownership of the existing building [e.g. include copies of any previously issued Code Compliance Certificate(s) (CCC) or Certificates of Acceptance(s) (COA)].
  6. Confirmation that people who use the building can do so safely and without endangering their health.
  7. People who use the building can escape from it in the event of a fire.
  8. Confirmation that the building is not insanitary (Section 123 of the Building Act 2004) or dangerous (Section 121 of the Building Act 2004).
  9. Provide photographs of the existing building.
  10. Information on any existing solid fuel heater(s) in the building.
  11. Assessment of any hazardous materials in the building.
  12. Confirmation on the type and general condition of any existing wall and roof claddings, plus associated flashings, assuming they’re still attached to the building structure.
  13. Details of any smoke / fire detection.

A Building Consent Application (for all new building work)

(except for any individual elements that may fall into any of the items listed in Schedule 1 of the Building Act 2004) for a relocated building This will include (as a minimum, but not restricted to) consideration of each of the following:

  1. Confirmation if the building works comes under the criteria of Restricted Building Work (RBW).
  2. Design information for the foundations.
  3. Design information of the stormwater and foul water drainage schemes (including on-site wastewater system report if applicable).
  4. A full bracing design suitable for the building in its new location.
  5. Details of any additional strengthening that may be necessary as a result of any change in the dead and live loads (including any increase in wind and earthquake loadings at the new site).
  6. Confirmation if a ‘change of use’ is proposed, and how compliance with Section 115 of the Building Act 2004 will be achieved (e.g. fire report, accessibility report, compliance schedule information e.t.c.).
  7. Details of the water supply to the building (if applicable).
  8. Details of any electrical supply to the building.
  9. Details of replacement claddings and associated flashings if applicable.
  10. The building consent documentation must clearly indicate whether the building is being moved in one or more sections.
  11. When moved in sections, documentation needs to show the location(s) of cuts used to separate sections of the building, and construction detailing to clearly show how the sections will be reconnected once they’ve been transported to the new site.
  12. Details of how the building, or its sections, will be protected and braced during transportation.

What does the Council Require for a Building being Constructed Using second-hand Materials?

In no specific order, the Council requires the following when considering a building consent application for a building being constructed using second-hand materials:

A Materials Condition Report

This is to be provided by an individual, or company, who has the appropriate competence, qualifications and experience to provide such a report, and who has the necessary insurance cover to undertake the work.

The materials Condition Report must include (as a minimum) all of the information below:

  1. Compliance of all the different materials to the durability requirements of the NZ Building Code (Clause B2, B2.3.1), and/or whether a waiver may need to be applied for.
  2. An acceptance and expectation that the construction of the new building using second-hand materials will be done so to meet the requirements of the current NZ Building Code, and not to the standards when the original building was first constructed.
  3. The age of the existing building. This may have a material effect on the intended of the building in its new location.
  4. Confirmation that the building materials are structurally sound.
  5. Assessment of any hazardous materials, and how these will be addressed.
  6. Cladding type(s).
  7. Provide photographs of the existing materials.
  8. The grading, and level of treatment, of any timber to be re-used.
  9. Type and level of treatment of an existing exposed steelwork.
  10. Confirmation of who will be responsible for the proper inspection and identification of all the building materials to determine that they’re suitable to be re-used. Please note, this is NOT within the scope of the works of, or a service provided by, the Councils’ Building Inspectors.
  11. The application documentation must clearly indicate which materials are to be re-used and those which require to be replaced with new materials (i.e. second-hand vs new).
  12. Consideration of how framing members and other building elements are to be re-connected where the materials may have been damaged during the deconstruction process.
  13. Details of how the materials will be protected during transportation.

A Full Building Consent Application (for all new building work)

(except for any individual elements that may fall into any of the items listed in Schedule 1 of the Building Act 2004). the Councils view is that the same level of information is required for any building works using second-hand Materials as it would be if you were constructing the same building using brand new materials.

Duty Building Control Officer

No two building consents are the same. As such, there’s an acceptance that there are going to be some interesting combination of circumstances that means the building works proposed may not exactly sit neatly in either of the criteria stated above. On the understanding that the Council reviews each Building Consent application on a case-by-case basis, if you do have any specific questions, please don’t hesitate to contact the Duty Building Control Officer for further assistance.

  • Duty Building Control Officer, ph. 03 543 8400