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Complying with the Conditions of your Resource Consent          

This page tells you some important details about your resource consent, and how you need to comply with its rules.

You may have to pay ongoing annual charges on your consent          

There may be ongoing fees and charges associated with your resource consent.  These are set by the Council as part of the Annual Plan process each year.

Administration, Monitoring & Supervision Charges of Resource Consents

You must start using your consent within five years*   

Under Section 125 of the Resource Management Act, a resource consent will lapse five years from the date that it is granted unless it has been 'given effect to'.  In other words, you must start using your consent - start the activity or build the structure - within five years, or it will lapse and you will need to apply for your resource consent again and go through the process again. 

This is to ensure that consent holders get on and use their resource consents and so that other people are not taken by surprise when someone suddenly starts operating a resource consent that was granted many years prior.

New Zealand Legislation: Section 125 of the Resource Management Act.

There are two ways that the lapse period can be extended.

  1. At the time that a resource consent is appiled for the applicant can ask that a longer lapse period (e.g. 10 years) be granted.  This is a good idea if the applicant does not think that he or she will get around to using the consent within the normal 5 year period;
  2. A consent holder can, after a consent is granted, apply to the Council to have the lapse period extended, but this must be done before the five year lapse period has expired or else the consent will have lapsed and no extension can be granted.  In this circumnstance the only course is to reapply for the resource consent.

* Note that some consents are issued with a shorter lapse period.  This is to ensure that no-one can use the consenting process to lock up a resource; e.g., bores are normally issued with a twelve month lapse period to ensure the activity is undertaken in a timely manner.

You may have ongoing monitoring and compliance checks to carry out          

The impact of the activity which is allowed by the consent will be monitored by Tasman District Council.  If extra monitoring and supervision is required because of non-compliance with the conditions of the consent, the costs of doing this will be charged to the consent holder.